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in it that's pretty -- it's sort of outlined but not detailed in legislation and has a big, big dollar figure around it. so, sort of the big plan. passing that along with a debt ceiling as sort of a big theory option instead of this mcconnell/reid plan, but it's so vague, as you can tell, and nothing that i have as any sort of firm plan, just, like, something that's sort of out there in the ether, they just don't have a plan at this point, no one does, john. >> it sounds like, and some people at home are saying, my god, there they go into washington speak again. i'll try to simply phi it. they are trying to fit certain pieces together to get you to several trillion in deficit reduction and that seems to be where we are, a bunch ideas. i'll go over to the wall a little bit, because jess talks about the mcconnell plan, that would give the president the authority to raise the debt ceiling and maybe they would come up with a commission with spending cuts. that's one backup plan. another backup plan is the gang of six. and i want to bring up the gang of six yesterday we talked about that. they hav
in three weeks the president continued to press for a big deal to raise the debt ceiling and to reduce the deficit by $4 trillion. >> i am still pushing for us to achieve a big deal. but what i also said to the group is if we can't do the biggest deal possible, then let's still be ambitious. let's still try to at least get a down payme on deficit reduction. we are obviously running out of time. and so what i have said to the members of congress is that you need over the next 24 to 36 hours to give me some sense of whayour plan is to get the debt ceiling rais through whatever mechanisms they can think about and show me a plan in tes of what you are doing for deficit and debt reduction. if they show me a serious plan, i'm readyo move. even if it requires some toh decisions on my part. and i'm hopeful that over the next couple of days 'll see this long jam broken because the american people i think understandably want toee washgton do its job. >> president obama ruled out a 2.4 trillion plan prosed by house republicans. >> in my expectation is that you will probably see the house vote on
the band-aid. eat our peas. >> reporter: of course, taxes remains the big sticking point. the president, though, insisting that nothing would change before 2013 so it would not happen during a difficult economic environment, but house speaker john boehner saying that there's no reason to raise taxes in order to control spending. he believes the best way to get revenue is by improving the overall economy by creating jobs. he says he is willing to get a deal done with democrats and the white house, but, in his words, it takes two to tango and they are not there yet. >> dan lothian at the white house, thanks. >>> the debt crisis overseas sending a chill through wall street this morning. less than half hour before the opening bell, u.s. stocks may be headed for another rough day. ali velshi is joining us live from new york. ali, what does it mean? >> well, you know, first of all, futures seem to be leveling out a little bit, kyra. a couple of things going on here. one as dan was just saying, we just heard from the treasury secretary who is making a speech and he says he is expecting a deal
it is that momentous. the flurry of talk last week about going big and swinging for the fences were underscoring the idea of the president and the speaker to persuade the democratic and republican rank- and-file to go for something as big as $4 trillion. it was a long shot to begin with. both sides decided to spend a few days pursuing this long shot and it turns out that speaker behner blinked first. he was the first one to realize publicly that he did not have the votes in his own troops to get this through because it would require too much. host: if the number goes down from $4 trillion, what gets left behind? guest: you go from $4 trillion down to something. the fall back number we think is $2.50 trillion. that is the amount of deficit reduction that would be necessary to get republicans to vote for an equivalent amount of debt ceiling increase. that is what is required to keep the treasury in the flush to get for the next election. that is the number and we know that the vice president had six members of congress and they were pretty close. they were at about $2 trillion. entirely from the s
a lot to talk about. big news over the budget and deficit reduction. president obama is rejecting calls for a short-term hike. he made a rare appearance in the press room. he's challenging them to seize the moment and cut a deal. >> i don't think the american people here sent us here to avoid tough problems. it's, in fact, what drives them nuts about washington. when both parties simply take the path of least resistance. i don't want to do that here. i believe right now, we have a unique opportunity to do something big. to tackle our deficit in a way that forces our government to live within our means. still allows us to invest in that future. >> all right. sounds good. sounds hopeful, it does. maybe something will get done, like everyone is going to come in. less than an hour after the president's invitation, john boehner missed the discussions saying a deal won't pass in the house, if it includes tax increases. he said, i'm happy to discuss the issues at the white house, but the discussions are fruitless until the president recognizes economic and legislative reality. >> that doesn't
that and in exchange for some minor tweaking of medicare, but nothing that really gives the republicans too big a win on that issue. and they would also argue, to gloria's point earlier, that you actually need this. this is not just a win for democrats, you need it because you need democratic votes to get this through because you're going to lose so many republicans who simply won't vote to extend the debt ceiling under any circumstances. so that's the calculus if you went with the middle deal, there would be an entirely different math for a tax reform package if you went with that larger deal that's more in the $4 trillion range. >> the irony here to me is that a larger deal would in many ways be easier to cut because it's so obvious what you would have to do. if you do a smaller deal, then you have to have eric cantor lay out by piece by piece by piece, cut by cut, by cut, what he would do if you don't have the revenue side of it. >> but to get the bigger deal, you need trust that they would actually then do comprehensive tax reform, rewrite the code so the republicans would make the case we didn't
call, while we're waiting, is from big sandy, texas. scott is a republican. good morning. caller: yes, susan, if i were a republican and in the negotiations, i would continue to bring up the immorality that the democrats are willing to -- and the fact that they're willing to steal the liberty of future generations with this humongous debt. they need to hold their feet to the fire, and in the end, obama and the democrats will have to come around. there's no doubt about it. we've got the upper hand. even though you've got the press on the president's side, and i want all these democrats that have called in here supporting obama this morning, just ask yourself, are you honestly better off? has his policies actually helped this country? or is it sending this country to oblivion? none of his policies, none of his stimulus, none of it has worked. not one single bit of it. we're worse off now than when he took office, and we're continuing to go downhill. it's time this iron-headed fool relent and let the adults take over. host: thanks for your call. scott from big sandy, texas. here is speak
brings another startling turn in this story. todas big turn was the dpe sigs by rupert and james murdoch james being his son and head of his british operations, to do 180-degree turn raer late in the day and having told the parliamentary committee that's going to hold a hearing on tuesday that they would not attend james murdoch saying ther loosely "i can't make it that day, i'll make it some other day. they then... summons were issued by the parliamentary committee which had fairly serious implications and they changed their minds. so we now know that come tuesday we will have the three principal executives that are in the frame on all of which, which is rurplt himself, his son, and rebek brooks who is the chief executive as you know of the murdoch subsidiary here in london being called to testify before parliament. catherine, where do you think the next term is in this story? >> well, john said it'saken a different turner. it's taking so many differen turns everyday that that's a really difficult questio i think that it is likely for the moment to stay focused on news international bec
. if you are going to rule out medicare now and say yeah, we are going to make big cuts but rule out medicare. that means democrats are focusing on 10%, discretionary spending that is our investments, r & d, education, infrastructure. the things we need to double and triple down on. the things we can afford to do in trying to catch up with china if we take care of the long-term structural debt on taxes, on health care and these other issues. >> yeah, we talked about the fact our health care system is at least 50% more expensive procedure by procedure than any other place in the world. we have this grip on a lot of the health care sector. we need health care reform. this is obvious. but it's been obvious for years. they don't do it on either side. >> coming up, connecticut governor dannel mall low. >> he's going to yell at you. >> i think he's in for a fight, yeah. yeah. >> mika is mad. she's not putting up with it anymore. >> this is incredible. sexual assault allegations against strauss-kahn. why it's on the verge of collapse. >> he was in yonkers at the time. come on. >>> first, he
's the big question, right? >> looking at the influence of the freshmen today, in general they believe and have very involved local voters to back them up that they were elected in 2010 with a mission to, reign in big government, specifically big government spending, and this debt ceiling debate fits right into that. here's more from one freshman tea partier. >> it would allow the debt ceiling to go up, but only if we had significant cuts, statutory caps and balanced budget amendment and there's a growing movement with that. we met with leadership, we met with majority leader eric cantor and were trying to impress upon them that we need to be for something as republicans, we need to define what we're for. >> senator paul says this is a fight, quote, too important to give up. jon. jon: what kind of influence do the new members have, though? >> well, republicans are in the minority and the senate, so less there, but in the house they're in the majority and tea partiers, or those who agree with the tea party on fiscal issues, among the 87 how freshmen have not been shy about staking their
for the tabloids. host: what about the broadsheets? guest: it is known occasionally. there was a big scandal about mp's expenses last year, which came from information that is the voice of -- information that is the will serve and got on a computer disk. my newspaper paid for that because they thought it was in the public interest. that is a rare instance of a broadsheet paper paying for information. for the tabloids, we call it checkbook journalism. salacious information about a night out on the town with a celebrity or pop star or encounters with celebrities. that culture has grown and become more insidious over the past 20 or 30 years. host: how would you describe, to help put it in perspective -- by the way, we will put the numbers on the screen as we continue this conversation about the phone hacking investigation in the u.k. prime minister cameron spoke this morning at a problem about it and we carry that live on c- span -- spoke this morning in parliament about it and we carry that live on c-span2. we carry rupert murdoch and rebekah brooks yesterday and we will speak about that. how do you
to have a big, serious debate about what we believe is the right way to guide america forward and when the future --win the future. i am confident i and i am confident that we will win the debate because we have the better approach. but in the meantime, for everyone's a while we can sit down and do something that actually helps the american people right now. >> you consider raising the debt ceiling fairly routine, but at this point is economic, garden. how can you get any agreement with congress? >> -- it is economic armageddon. how can you get any agreements with congress? >> i will keep working hard on it and i hope that this debate has focused the american people's attention a bit more and will subject congress to scrutiny. i think increasingly, the american people will say to themselves, you know what, if a party or politician is constantly taking the position constantly taking the position of, "my way or the highway ," constantly been locked into ideologically rigid positions, then we will remember that at the polls. it is cumulative. the american people are not paying attention t
a story saying that big mortgages are back. the financial times and its financial section has two stories of highlights, one talking about stress tests and you may have remembered those from a few years ago done in the united states to test the fiscal capabilities of u.s. banks. this takes a look at european banks. but the one story from new york this morning looks at city baverbing looking at their profits, surging 24% to $3.3 billion. city results mirrors jp morgan. we have been talking about the notion of comfroms when it comes to discussions about the debt and should congress members of the congress republicans primarily as far as these discussions go, and the president, compromise on their ideals when it comes to debt talks? all available for you to join us. e-mail and twitter as well. new jersey. go ahead. caller: good morning. i would just like to say that i wish that the congress would do like the president said and try to put aside their issues just this once. so that the country can be saved economically. i'm so tired of the posturing that they continue to do in the house of rep
the big fight's going going to be over the debt ceiling limit. that's where the hard negotiations are going to be put out. and then they will probably be given a new number, and they'll have to revisit that bill that they've worked on in committee and meet the new number. so if that's what happens, it's probably a good thing. host: so first things first. guest: look, here's what each department or each function of government is going to be getting, and then work out what you think you can get, the most bang for the buck, so to speak. host: let's get to calls for you. we're going to begin with a call from los angeles. michelle is a democrat there. you're on for david keating of the club for growth. caller: given that you made the comments about t republican candidate mitt romney has developed an unshakable reputation as a flip-flop per uses federal powers to coerce taxpayers, and tim pawlenty is hard to pin down, who do you like? guest: well, what the club for we haveohas been doing, published a series of white papers on many of the presidential candidates, all of those that have d
to be an american? not a big change when president obama came to office. what does that say to you? guest: remarkable continuity about something that is very important in defining this as a people. it does not seem to matter whether we have a democratic or republican president. we are patriotic nonetheless. host: james, pittsburg, republican line. caller: my comment is that you have to poll the younger crowd and they are the strongest and the fastest and most easily -- and it is easier for them to take in all the information they have take in. they are more alterable to become a soldier and not many of them are politically savvy. once they get into the war, they are generally -- most of the men i know that have come back especially from this war and from vietnam, they speak to the fact that they were fighting for its other. host: we will leave it there. guest: that is true. men who have had that experience in war talk about it that way. they also love their country. one of the things we see, it's a hard thing to take polls of soldiers because it's tough to do. but when you do, they are ve
in a very big and vital state of new york. >> most importantly, one, the white house says it's not true and secondly, biden himself, he's been the target of getting off a ticket since january of 2009. when hillary clinton was going to take it over and that would be the smart thing to do politically. as much as people might have strong feelings about vice president biden, i think that for president obama, he's been a good vice president. he marches his soldiers on. he does the bidding. and he -- i think there's no reason for it to change but also this, while i respect the reporter and i'm sure he's got good sources, i just don't see what changing courses mid stream and getting the governor from new york gets you >> you can tell how much the white house doesn't want to talk about something when they dump it out on a friday. according to the economic council of advisors, they've come out with their seventh quarterly report and what they said is the stimulus, remember, it was going to save us from big -- >> save or create three million jobs. >> it was going to do that. it didn't do that. o
a big misunderstanding. the 18-year-old placed what was feared to be a bomb near the beam structure in chicago's millennium park. it wasn't a bomb. it was two bricks duct taped together with wires hanging out of it, a prop from a sci-fi costume he wore to a convention. he was charged with disorderly conduct. a scare for defense secretary leon panetta. three rockets slammed into baghdad's green zone on day two of his visit there. the secretary is fine and no one else was hurt. panetta flew to baghdad from afghan t afghanistan and he's meeting with leaders there and meeting with u.s. troops. early wake-up call on the shuttle atlantis. >> ♪ i get knocked down i get back up again i get knocked down i get back up again ♪ >> seems like i just heard it on the radio yesterday. waking up to the song and today they will be supplying a supply module on the outside of the international space station using a robotic arm and they'll prepare for a space walk tomorrow. meantime, nasa keeping a close eye on some space degree that could come dangerously close to the space station. the duke and d
and a big part of this community. i was grateful to see him here today before i turn over to arianna who i think is an expert on journalism and editorial, i want to go through a few points of real big things that we're betting on as a company, not talk about aol but let's talk about the things we see in the future and why we're putting such an investment in journalism. number one question i get from wall street all the time is why journalism, why are you choosing when the rest of the world seems to be going away from journalism? why are you opening up a thousand patches? why did you buy the "huffington post"? and i think the things i'm about to talk about are a core essence of what we believe them. the first is really a bit of the human needs stage which is, if you woke up and today was your first day on planet earth, what would you knows and what would you see? i think there's some very stark things. one is there's four or 5 billion phones in peoples pockets and a lot of smart phone growth across the world, which means people are going to be connected full-time with information all the ti
boehner and president obama are still in contact. they are still working towards an agreement. big stumbling block, taxes still in the way, martin. >> i should explain, mike, that you're inside because there's a lot of rain outside the white house today. >> another major storm, that's right. >> absolutely. >> thanks so much. >> well, now that he's walked out of debt talks with vice president biden, taken a fight to president obama and clashed with speaker boehner, is there any compromise that will sit with house majority leader eric cantor? nbc's luke russert is covering that. republicans, what are they willing to sacrifice in order to reach an agreement? got a copy of the "washington post" which liberally quotes you, but have you been able to get an answer to your question yet? >> reporter: no, and they offer two explanations as to why, martin. number one, they say that a concession republicans are making is just in fact allowing the debt ceiling to go up because that's something that's so unpopular within the house republican caucus. the popular sentiment here in washington, d.c.
social security, you don't get a penny of it. every penny of that goes into the big pot and it's distributed to everyone else. anybody who dies to young, all of their money has been wasted. it is just going into the government pot. the second thing you have to know, is if you save up to much, when you start receiving it, you get taxed on it again. if you get taxed on social security when you are your money what you are working and then after you start receiving it, if you save up to much because you were worried about it, you get taxed on it again. it gets added to whatever income you have from your savings. host: do you think private savings accounts, that your social security should be yours when you pay in, you should be booked to get or keep or transfer? caller: i certainly do. that is why i voted for president bush to the second time around. i did not agree with him for very much but i agree with him on that point. people should have their names on their accounts and what ever they put into it should belong to them. so even if they die when their 50, that money goes to the
. hi honey! ♪ h-o-t-w-i-r-e... ♪ hotwire.com >>> no progress reported tonight on the big deficit reduction talks at the white house. with that, this warning tonight from moody's investor service. the federal government could lose its top of the line credit rating if the white house and congress can't agree on a plan to increase the nation's debt ceiling, meaning allow washington to borrow more money to help pay its bills. that warning came just a few hours after this sober math lesson from the fed chairman ben bernanke. since the government borrows 40 cents of every dollar it spends, a fall you'ilure to increase washington's credit limit would require a 40% cutback in spending. >> significant cuts in social security, medicare, military pay, or some combination of those in order to avoid borrowing more money. >> now that sounds ominous, but some conservatives think the catastrophe scenarios are exaggerated. >> if congress fails to raise the debt ceiling by $2.5 trillion, that somehow the united states will go into default, and we will lose the full faith and credit of the united s
boehner has proposed. boehner has a pretty big job on his hands of maintaining that republican unity that we have seen so far at a time when democratic kennedy is coalescing because of anger over how these talks have gone. host: alexander blogging, thank you. our question this morning is, with the debt limit is affecting more financial decisions. let's go to cleveland, ohio on the democratic line. caller: good morning. host: is it affecting your financial decisions? caller: at this point, no permit but i am living on a fixed income. i am very much worried about whether or not this debt limit will be raised or not to coz i know the treasury department is going to have to make some decisions if it is not raced. i am confident social security recipients will receive their cash benefits. i am also confident those who are desperately in need of their money will receive their benefits. i am confident president obama and the democratic party are going to look out for the needy but i am highly unsettled about what is going on. mr. bolton made the fact that i do not think this debt limit is s
, but it means, mr. president, that we can't be raising taxes on the job creators, and there is a big debate right now about how do we get ourselves out of this fiscal mess. i would submit to my colleagues that the real issue here is spending. if you go back to the foundation of our country, the year 1800, we were only spending 2% of our entire economic output on the government, the federal government. this year we're going to spend 24% to 25%. the historical average over the past 40 years is about 20.6%. we are dramatically higher in terms of what we are spending on our federal government as a percentage of our entire economy. to me, clearly, we don't have a revenue issue here in washington. we have a spending issue. which would suggest that we ought to get after spending, after federal spending, particularly spending that is -- is duplicative, redundant, there are so many things in the federal government that we spend money on that we need to get that waste and that -- and all those types of wasteful spending out of our spending here in washington, d.c., but we also have to focus on those
to see the quick video i promised. jfc engages a big tent of stakeholders, a big tent in shake holders because as i mentioned, a broken framework fabric of society requires as i mentioned a patchwork of everybody being brought together. not just a small group, not just one small sector, not just the military or not just the political actors but all the sectors coming together including the community, government, society, all people who need to buy into this system and be part of it and agree. and have that social contract. and the week before last, we published a case study, it's thick, a case study on jsd and tleeshsz a smaller version on our website but we tried someone who was involved walk step-by-step to paint the picture and just distill it and just a few policy recommendations. jsd, despite its name dialog is not just talking. it's not just talking and then leaving. it's really a vehicle or a means to do things that are vital to strengthening rule of law and post-conflict environment. there are a number of different things. it all has to be dependent upon the country context and
. there was a big issue at the end of the last congress that threatened a meltdown over whether or not we were going to extend the package of tax cuts. then we have the cr, threatening to shut down of the government. now we are having a high-stakes game of chicken that could have significant implications for the global economy as well as devastation for what we face to going forward. and then you know what? we will be right back with that with the budget, not once but twice, before the election. most in the house want to see something that is more sustainable and allows us to get back to the business of helping all americans get back to work, rebuilding the country, and dealing with long-term solutions rather than short-term fixes to deal with theoretical issues with the budget. host: to be clear, if the reid proposal could come before the house, would you vote for it? guest: i have not seen it. i had a dinner with a friend of mine in the senate last night who says that they are interested in the details. they have not seen the details yet. i am not going to commit to something that no one i know ha
the c. and he appeared to be picking up the votes. lesson to shawn duffy. >> is this as big as we wanted to go? heck, no. we wanted to go bigger. we ran on going bigger. but this is the only proposal on the table that accomplishes the goals that we set out to do. >> progress but apparently and this is why we have such a drama unfolding on capitol hill, not enough progress. the speaker is still short the votes. he's delayed the key vote, a key vote to not only if you are sitting at home, maybe you think the debt ceiling should be raised, maybe you should, it's a fundamentally important political showdown, some people think the speaker's hold on his job could be in jeopardy if he loses this vote. let's go to kate bolduan, do they believe they can twist enough arms to get enough votes to pass this tonight? >> reporter: fabulous question this evening and one that is very hard to answer at this moment. i can tell you, let me just give you the lay of the land what you can probably see a little bit of, john, you were talking about the speaker's office, it's right down the hallway, what we're se
they get a tax-exempt status? >>reporter: that is the big question is. any groups that a right, obviously, to form and criticize fox news. the question is, should that be a taxper, subsidized, tax-exempt deductibl activity. media matters is something called a 501 (c) 3 referring to the section of the code that covers it and deductions to media matters are people getting to take off their taxes as if they gave money to the red cross or salvation army. and media matters is increasingly political in recent years and the founder has formatted what is scale add super pac to raise large amounts of money to defeat republican candidates and there are reports that the white house is in the entirely happy with that because they felt he was more effective attacking fox news at media matters. the question is, should that be subsidized by the federal government. deep deep the deep pockets, obviously, george soros and tell us about his past for those that do not know. >>reporter: he is a billionaire, naturalized american citizen and has in the past been caught up in insider trading activity in jump, an
if your dreams are not big enough and they scare you, then they are not big enough to beat the dreams of dhaka to scare you and we have to dream about when we are really on the team and when we are really on the team we may take one for the team occasionally. only when it is our turn. but if they are not letting us on the team we can't take it anymore, and the fact that this is really serious, this whole thing about social security, about health care, all of this could come unraveled, and these dharma courts the decision and all was that, these are all impacting women and children and all of the cuts are women and children that is not the america that i am a part of. so, when in, people were going to tell you ten reasons they are mad they don't want to go vote, just tell them get mad and go vote. but the real reason to go vote, or you will not believe how bad your next time. thank you for everything you've been doing. thank you. thank you. [applause] [cheering] cheering] "washington journal" continues. host: this is david keating, executive director of the club for growth, which is wh
, and i see that you are less and less likely to be allowed by a big cover. we are building america to practice your religion, to practice your belief in laws, to accept responsibility for individually and as families and as government for your actions, and in that regard, i believe the american dream is lost. host: thanks. we're going to stop you at this time. thanks for adding your comments. on twitter, don't fall into the belief that the dream is dead. you're being manipulated for political purposes. parkville, indiana, sam is a democrat there, to talk about the american dream. good morning to you, sam. caller: hi. it from the united states of america to corporate states of america, united states of america, united corporations of america. corporations own this country. they have the republicans baltimore and paid for. they have the supreme court bought and paid for. we really have a lot of problems coming our way. thank you. host: thanks for your call. "baltimore sun" has a front-page story about immigration. opponents of tuition breaks for illegal immigrants have more signature
company called two men with big hearts moving and storage. but he fell behind in his bills to this company. this storage company because of medical bills that had piled up for him. >> so he just passed away and the family is trying to figure out what they're going to do at the funeral and what they would like to do is get a hold of some of his military stuff, including his two purple hearts but the problem is that particular company is owed by the family $600. the family went over and talked to them and they knocked it down to $500. but nonetheless, they would like to have the stuff for the funeral next tuesday but they got to come up with $500. here's the son of the veteran. >> he was a very patriotic person. >> dad wanted to go out in a blaze of glory. that was on the back of the fire truck. something we want to give for dad. that was one of his last requests. >> he had it for five years. it would be thousands of dollars. don kennedy owns the company so he's not going to release the stuff as of right now unless they pay the $500 which is just -- they just want to get the -- they want t
on it but i do know that it was in an effort to try to make sure that the rates that the two big providers in mississippi, and, of course, energy was heavily invested in louisiana as well. but i don't know the details on that but i do know. >> mr. mack so, have you had any experience with this kind of think? >> we have not. >> mr. serino, i'm going to the i am going to continue on this. chairman, i would love to talk to you about it and senator mccaskill and i have been talking about it. you know, if this community would've happened to have a municipal provider, let's say they paid 10% under the stafford act of the repair costs, they would be passing along to .5 million to the ratepayers instead of 25 million. court if they have a 75, 25 sure, they'll be passing along 6.2 the ratepayers instead of 25 million. those rate players pay federal taxes in exactly the same way that the neighboring community of carthage that has a municipal utility pays federal taxes. we have more experience with this with devastating i storms. we have miles and miles of polls broken off, and the mileage that is in
Search Results 0 to 47 of about 48 (some duplicates have been removed)

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